Tennessee Williams' A Streetcar Named Desire directed by L. Peter Callender

Performances

Sunday March 4
Opening
3pm
Saturday March 10 8pm
Sunday March 11 3pm
Saturday March 17 8pm
Sunday March 18 3pm

Running time: 2 hours and a 15 minute intermission
Recommended minimum age: 12

Venue
Marines’ Memorial Theatre
609 Sutter Street, 2nd Level
San Francisco, CA, 94102

Plan Your Visit

Tickets
$35, General Seating

Buy Tickets

Brown Paper Tickets
(800) 838-3006
Customer Service available 24/7


Group Ticket Discount: 15% off purchase of 10+ tickets

Buy Group Tickets
Group tickets are handled by
African-American Shakespeare
(415) 762-2071 ext. 6

Subscriptions
3-Play Series Subscription: $60
Attend Cinderella, A Streetcar Named Desire, AND, Richard III at a single discounted price. Savings of up to $35!

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March 4–18, 2018

A Streetcar Named Desire

Written by Tennessee Williams
Directed by L. Peter Callender

Struggle for power is the theme plot in this dynamic Pultizer Prize-winning and critically acclaimed play by Tennessee Williams. A Streetcar Named Desire reveals the depth of a volatile relationship between Stanley and Stella Kowalski. Gas is poured on the flame when Stella’s sister, Blanche DuBois, arrives on their doorstep. Fleeing from reality caused by her romantic illusions, the Southern Belle teacher, Blanche DuBois, needs the safety of her sister and brutish brother-in-law for relief and ease from the horrible rumors and gossip. In a struggle for power, secrets are exposed and revealed in this devastatingly disturbing production. A classic American play with unforgettable characters. Watch, feel, laugh, cry… share and talk about it.

#StreetcarAASC

Director’s Note

The lyricist asks: “Do you smile to tempt a lover, Mona Lisa? Or is this your way to hide a broken heart?” Questions will endure over the years about the world’s most iconic paintings and sculptures; as well as our literature: novels, poems, and certainly our plays. Questions about Tennessee Williams’ A Streetcar Named Desire, the play, as well its characters, will keep coming. The questions asked in 1947, when the play premiered on Broadway, may be asked today, but in different ways. We are a different people in a different world. Yet we are still intrigued, inspired, and incensed by what goes on. I ask that we come to the theater with new eyes and ears, examining this play with a new perspective and forming our conclusions afresh. Leave your preconceived notions at the door and introduce yourself to Stella and Stanley, to Blanche and Mitch, to Steve and Eunice, as new friends worth getting to know. In this way, I think you will enjoy this play even more. Characters you may have had trouble understanding, your life experiences may now allow you to see with more clarity. Even those who seemed unforgivable on first read, may come to have admirable qualities. This is a classic American play with unforgettable characters. Watch, feel, laugh, cry…share and talk about it. After all is said and done, this beautiful play is not just “A cold and lonely, lovely work of art.”

—L. Peter Callender